Andrew Roberts is a mexican artist and writer. He incorporates elements of gameplay, roleplay and worldbuilding into his multi-platform practice, recognizing in these mechanisms a cultural structure where consumption and production become one. Researching the material dimension of horror, Roberts’s digital animations, installations, sculptures and poetry treat colonial agents as possessed images and haunted spaces. He is primarily concerned with representational systems, military technology and the parasitic relationship between Mexico and the United States of America, often exploring the links between optics, warfare and entertainment.

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Protean Silicone Matter
2023


Protean Silicone Matter

Pequod Co., Art Basel Miami Beach

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Haunted Silicone Matter

Pequod Co., Art Basel Miami Beach

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Tank
2023


Tank

Pequod Co., Mexico City

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Necromancer
2022


Necromancer (Vanitas)

House of Chappaz, Barcelona

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Necromancer (Mining Mana)

House of Chappaz, Valencia

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A hourse on fire is a ghost, a factory on fire is a specter
2022


A house on fire is a ghost, a factory on fire is a specter

Best Practice, San Diego

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The Harvest
2021


The Harvest (Pilot Episode)

Collaboration with Mauricio Muñoz

Delaplane, San Francisco

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The Harvest

Collaboration with Mauricio Muñoz

Delaplane, San Francisco

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We are sorry to notify you that due to the end of the world...
2020


La Horda (The Horde)

Pequod Co., Mexico City

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CARGO

Pequod Co., Mexico City

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Undead

Pequod Co., Mexico City

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Isla, dinos tu nombre (Island, tell us your name)
2019


Isla, dinos tu nombre

Roca, Isla, Glaciar, Museo Jumex, Mexico City

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Towards Electromateriality
2018


Towards Electromateriality

Ficción y tiempo, Centro Cultural Universitario Tlatelolco

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Towards Electromateriality

Ficción y tiempo, Centro Cultural Universitario Tlatelolco

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Sunrise Corporation
2017


Brief History of the Sun

Centro Cultural Tijuana

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The Complex

Centro Cultural Tijuana

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Sunrise Corporation Headquarters

Centro Cultural Tijuana

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We are sorry to notify you that due to the end of the world your package
Pequod Co., Mexico City
11/30/22 — 05/18/23

La Horda (The Horde), 2020, eight-channel 4K CGI video, color, sound; each channel approx. 3–4 min. 



Videos available at www.vimeo.com/showcase/8325526

Installation view at the Whitney Biennial 2022: Quiet as It's Kept, Whitney Museum, New York City, 2022


Installation view at AMEXICA, Institut Culturel du Mexique in Paris, 2023


In 1989, Nintendo revolutionized the video game industry by offering a portable 8-bit gaming experience. Game Boy was the first handheld device that freed players from arcades and family home setups, becoming the quintessential object of desire for kids in the ’90s. In Mexico, the high demand for video game devices combined with the elevated cost of imported goods before (and even, after) NAFTA gave place to a prolific market of piracy gaming, including low-cost bootleg imitations, hacked consoles, and a myriad of unlicensed copies sold through informal trade across the country. Today, Mexico consumes more video games than any other country in Latin America. 

The same year Game Boy was launched in North America, a long-term joint effort between Mexican and US authorities led to the arrest of Miguel Ángel Félix Gallardo, founder and leader of the presumed Cartel de Guadalajara. His arrest marked the dissolution of the first Mexican criminal organization dedicated exclusively to drug trafficking and the disbandment of an alleged alliance made between the most powerful drug lords at the time. The separation of this coalition allowed for the consolidation of situated organizations working independently—and oftentimes, in opposition—from each other. The border towns of Northern Mexico became the theater of operations for the activities of vicious groups that identified themselves by geography and blood-bath-filled origin myths. The Cartel de Tijuana was one of them. At the end of the ’90s and early ’00s, even with Game Boys or bootleg handheld devices, kids would rather game from home to avoid the crossfire of the criminal organizations that violently disputed the most coveted border-crossing points. 

Artist Andrew Roberts traces these events as part of his aesthetic genealogy, profiling an artistic language particular to a late-millennial growing up between Tijuana and San Diego. First as a player, then as an artist, Roberts is familiar with the narrative potential of video game design. Amidst on-screen zombie-shooting and bloodshed on the streets, survival horror means protecting yourself from everyday mayhem without the infinite ammo reserves offered in the virtual realm. When the footage on the news and shooter video games look very much alike, what else is left to do than to choose a character?

The installation of the video component of the exhibition We are sorry to notify you that due to the end of the world your delivery has been delayed (2020) resembles a character selection screen. Presented as 4K video portraits, Roberts introduces eight zombie characters in workwear, affiliating them to transnational companies like Amazon, Walmart, and Netflix. In a chorus of voices with perfect diction, each of them shares their own —almost premonitory, somehow philosophical— expectations for the end of the world. Unlike the narratives that approach the figure of the living dead from the mechanisms of othering, this group of zombies turns out to be very relatable. Not able to escape the logics of late-capitalism, they had become labor machines driven by Apocalyptic fantasies. And, like most of us, they are working themselves to death.

Excerpt from a text by Paulina Ascencio Fuentes for CURA
Undead, 2020, performance, tattoos on silicone mask and sleeves, VR headset and video game console



CARGO: a certain doom, 2020, tattoos on pigmented silicone, 20 × 40 × 15 cm (7 3⁄4 × 15 3⁄4 × 6 in)


REANIMATOR: days gone bye, 2020, tattoos on pigmented silicone, 35 × 50 × 20 cm (13 3⁄4 × 19 1⁄2 × 7 3⁄4 in)


PET SEMATARY: the heart's desire, 2020, tattoos on pigmented silicone, 48 × 35 × 10 cm (19 × 13 3⁄4 × 4 in)


EXHUMED: miles behind us, 2020, tattoos on pigmented silicone, 35 × 30 × 28 cm (13 3⁄4 × 11 3⁄4 × 11 in)


BRAINDEAD: what comes after, 2020, tattoos on pigmented silicone, 20 × 40 × 15 cm (7 3⁄4 × 15 3⁄4 × 6 in)


PONTYPOOL: too far gone, 2020, tattoos on pigmented silicone, 30 × 30 × 10 cm (11 ¾  × 11 ¾  × 4 in)


COOTIES: the rotten core, 2020, tattoos on pigmented silicone and cotton hat, 35 × 25 × 30 (13 ¾  × 9 ¾  × 11 ¾  in)

We are sorry to notify you that due to the end of the world your package, installation view at Pequod Co., Mexico City, 2020



CARGO: A lone rider in the burning sky and his trusted armored dragon, 2020, Tattoos on pigmented silicone, anti-static foam and hard case 42 × 52 × 50 cm (16 1⁄2 × 20 1⁄2 × 19 1⁄2 in), installation view at Lodos, Mexico City, 2020


CARGO: A lone rider in the burning sky and his trusted armored dragon, installation view at the  7th Athens Biennale: Eclipse, 2021




RHYTHM RATTLESNAKE: The world ends with you, baby centipede, 2020, tattoo on pigmented silicone, 23 × 15 × 9 cm (9 × 6 × 3 ½  in), installation view at the 7th Athens Biennale: Eclipse, 2021


SMASH: My head fell through the roof and a demon played basketball with it (Toon Dark Magician Girl), 2020, tattoos on pigmented silicone and poly bubble mailer, installation view at the 7th Athens Biennale: Eclipse, 2021


REANIMATOR: days gone bye, 2020, installation view at AMEXICA, Institut Culturel du Mexique in Paris, 2023